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Earth Globe with mobile phoneIt’s a good time to be a gadget geek. Smartphones have come along way since the original iPhone and Blackberry struggled for dominance. Apple’s touch-screen innovation has largely eliminated the old Qwerty keyboard, and smartphones are packed with processors that could run computers.

The smartphone boon has opened the doors for competition. Apple remains a top player in the market, but in 2012, Samsung’s Galaxy S3 outsold Apple’s iPhone 4s, according to cbsnews.com. Familiar tech companies are making a mobile splash, as well. Search-giant Google purchased Motorola Mobility in 2012, adding a hardware wing to their well-documented software mobile division. Facebook recently released its latest mobile innovation, an integrated app collaboration dubbed Facebook Home.

Smartphone innovation is in full swing. Which device will you choose as your digital companion?

Samsung

Less than a year ago, Samsung introduced iPhone’s biggest competitor yet, the Galaxy S3. It was big, fast and sleek, and consumers noticed. Samsung isn’t resting on the S3’s success, though. In March, the Korean manufacturer introduced the Galaxy S4. Predictably, it’s even bigger, even faster and even more impressive. A mammoth 5-inch 1080p screen connects users with the device, and new eye-tracking technology delivers a “wow” factor. Samsung is riding a wave of momentum, and it doesn’t appear to be slowing down.

Apple

Cupertino-based Apple found a release cycle that launched them to the top of the smartphone market. Introduce a redesigned phone every two years, and upgrade under-the-hood hardware and software on off years. Apple’s grip on the mobile crown might be slipping, but the “Think Different” brand isn’t afraid to innovate. According to Ibtimes.com, Apple could release a less expensive iPhone this fall. If critics had to criticize Apple’s current mobile products, most would point their high price tags. A less expensive iPhone could reestablish Apple as the clear leader in the smartphone industry.

Google

If we’ve learned anything about Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, it’s that they think big. It’s no surprise, then, that when Google officially purchased Motorola Mobility last year, it sent shock waves through the mobile industry. Google could make its next big mobile announcement as early as next month, when it hosts the Google I/O conference in San Francisco. Rumors indicate the coming of an “X Phone,” Google’s first release since acquiring Motorola. Based on Google’s apparent commitment to mobile development, an X-Phone and subsequent smartphones from Google could take the mobile market by storm.

Facebook/HTC

Mark Zuckerberg and company stirred speculation of a Facebook Phone when they announced a mobile event in April. Rumors proved partially accurate. Facebook didn’t release its own hardware, but it did announce a collaboration with Taiwanese manufacturer HTC. The HTC First features Facebook Home, the social network’s expanded mobile application. Facebook Home delivers a comprehensive Facebook experience in any application. Facebook messages pop up like text messages, and the user’s newsfeed updates on the home screen. Social media enthusiasts will appreciate this collaboration.

Blackberry

Blackberry may not be the mobile superstar it once was, but it’s not going away without a fight. Formerly known as RIM (Research in Motion), Blackberry ditched its signature Qwerty keyboard and joined the touch-screen market with the Z10. Computerworld.com noted that Blackberry fans should appreciate the new Blackberry 10 phones, but tech-obsessed consumers may still look elsewhere. Still, the release indicates that Blackberry isn’t afraid to adapt to the times.

You watch as the butterfly lights upon a flower, its wings vivid in the fading sunlight. You can see as its proboscis extends down to drink, and watch as it then flutters to another flower. The warmth in the air is obvious from the haze and the shimmers in the distance, and you can almost feel what it’s like to be there. Of course, your air conditioning ruins some of the effect, but your new 4K TV is proving to be quite immersive.

image by Digitas Photo

4K television, or Ultra HD, is set to be the new standard of high quality viewing in the home. Manufacturers are hoping that the increased resolution and incredible detail provided by the sets will be enough to motivate buyers, even as many have only just made the transition to standard HD.

The Technology

Television manufacturers will essentially double your resolution with 4K models. 4K refers to around 4,000 pixels wide with a height of around 2,000 pixels, according to CNET, but there are several different standards that are grouped under the Ultra HD title. In comparison, the high definition standard for HD is 1,920 pixels wide by 1,080 pixels high.

The resolution of 4K is worthy of movie theaters. The technology makes sense, as most shows are now shot on 4K- capable cameras. What you view in the near future at home may be exactly as the creators of the show intended, in all the glorious detail.

The Cost

There have been some doubts as to whether consumers would be willing to shell out large amounts of money for yet another new technology. TV manufacturers have been doing what they can to answer such questions by producing 4K TVs at multiple price points.

For those who want the best, there is the 84-inch model offered by Sony for $25,000, says CNN.com. For those on more of a budget, Sony is also releasing a 55-inch and a 65-inch, at $4,999 and $6,999 respectively. Another company, Seiki, is offering a 50-inch 4K TV for $1,500.

Prices like these indicate companies are getting serious about putting 4K into as many homes as possible. It should also be noted that this is just the beginning — technology always drops in price after a few years on the market. Ultra HD should become affordable for the majority of buyers in the future.

At Wimbledon

Sony is teaming up with the BBC to film this year’s Wimbledon Championships in 4K, according to TechRadar. Sony appears to be all in for the future of the technology, and apparently wants to get it out there to as many as possible. The extreme detail offered by 4K seems to be a perfect match for sports enthusiasts, where every detail is noted and measured.

4K and 3D

3D television failed to take off like manufacturers hoped it would, but 4K may make the technology more appealing. Because of the increased resolution of 4K, 3D movies are said to look much better on the new televisions, especially those using passive 3D. This is good for viewers who prefer the lighter, more comfortable passive 3D glasses.

According to www.GetDirectTV.org, DirecTV already offers 3D sports and movie packages. Sony is also attempting to get DirecTV and DISH to offer 4K broadcasts in regular programming, which will give Ultra HD TV owners plenty to view on their new sets.

Here a open source means to home automate:

http://m.apnews.com/ap/db_268791/contentdetail.htm?contentguid=62xTmRcK

A video from AP Mobile:

With Flick of Finger, a Dumb House Gets Smart

thumbnailIn this interconnected world, the next big thing may be a fully-wired house. With everything from door locks to coffee makers to pet feeders controllable from an app on your smart phone. The AP’s Lee Powell enters the smart house. (May 16)

See Video Details

The following story on Newsy was interesting:

AT&T Allows Home Security Control via Smartphones

Nowadays, it can be difficult for the average consumer to keep up with the rapid pace of technological development. Most businesses share the same challenge. In fact, the most successful companies gain a competitive edge by continuing to evolve and adapt to these incessant changes.

Home security is one industry that is undergoing wholesale changes in response to technological innovation. The business was born in when Boston inventor was issued the first patent on electromagnetic burglar alarms in 1853. Over a century and a half later, high-tech wireless alarm systems are replacing traditional hard-wired systems as the industry standard. But here’s the kicker: the home security business is beginning to branch outside of – well – home security. In addition to catching burglars and detecting fires, modern security systems are now also being designed to manage energy consumption, control electronic appliances – and much more.

This new and exciting technology is called home automation.

What is home automation

We are now living in a gadget-dominated world. Tablets, smartphones, 3D televisions and other gizmos play an integral role in our everyday lives – and they aren’t going anywhere anytime soon. The future is exciting, daunting and confusing all at once. As technology continues to advance and give birth to new innovations, it can become extremely challenging to keep up with all of this innovation.

But what if you can make all of this technology work together?

A connected, or “smart home” was once considered a fantasy that could only be seen in futuristic Hollywood movies and TV shows. But now, this technology is not only a reality, but also affordable for the masses.

A home automation system allows you to integrate the various technological devices work together into one simple-to-use application – accessible through a remote control. These systems can be managed within the home, or remotely, using a smartphone, computer or other web-enabled device. Listed below are some of the things a home automation system can do:

  • Control your thermostat and lights
  • Watch real-time surveillance video of your home
  • Play music in any room with connected speakers
  • Control your home theater system
  • Arm and disarm your home security system
  • Remotely lock and unlock doors

Home security adopts home automation

Many high-profile residential security companies have already begun offering these services to their customers. For example ADT (check out http://www.securitychoice.com/), released ADT Pulse in October 2010 – giving their customers the ability to manage nearly every aspect of their home from a smartphone application.

The future of home automation

The shocking part of home automation technology – it’s just in its infancy. Today’s smart devices don’t all run on the same technology (X10, Insteon, ZigBee, etc.), making many devices or systems incompatible with one another.

While it’s hard to know what home automation technology will look like down the road, its future as a valuable commodity is anything but uncertain. According to international industrial company Ingersoll Rand, the smart home industry will reach $2.5 billion in just two years – a 30 percent increase in the number of households with such home automation systems.

Cali Lewis has been interested in home automation for as long as I’ve beeen following her video blog.  In her highlights from CES 2013 she mentions a few items and her new cohost did an entire segment on one product but I was actually hoping for a more thorough investigation of this subject.  Maybe next year.

Her latest post back at GeekBeat.TV is on home gardening

 

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Finally, the genetics nerds have been put in their place!!  Michael Scroggins fills the role of Kirk with Razib Khan as Khan.  Read on directly at ethnography.com .  I’ve seen Michael take people apart in person, but never before via the pen.

In the Star Trek episode “Space Seed”, Khan was a genetically engineered human who, in the wake of the eugenic wars, was exiled to a distant planet. This Khan is a sensitive observer of the human condition, who at one point, asks Kirk if he has ever read Milton. Kirk, in turn, laments, “Yes, I understand.” Khan, of course, was a sensitive and wise commentator on the perils and potential of genetics. There exists a second Khan, however, and his vengeful wrath has been visited upon me. This post concerns that second Khan who, unlike the first Khan, is neither sensitive nor wise. The first Khan expounds on the terrible responsibility his position has left him in. The second Khan expounds ondating and eugenics.  A few samples of this second Khan’s “science” in action follow. Excerpts taken from the links above: Khan on dating:

A few points need to be made clear: males do not exhibit statistically significant racial preferences by and large. That’s somewhat shocking to me. I’m not surprised that older subjects have weaker biases, I suspect frankly they’re more realistic and don’t want to narrow their options anymore than they have to. Finally, I’m totally confused as to why hotties would be less race conscious; you would figure if hybrid vigor is real that the marginal returns would be greatest for the fuglies (specifically, assuming that fugitude correlates with individual mutational load and hybridization would be better at masking that load). But the most relevant demographic point is that these are Columbia University graduate students. In other words, a cognitively & socially elite sample.

This selection makes me smile a bit as I am a member of the “elite” population he is writing about. Which is a nice compliment, if a bit at odds with his contention that I am a “Left Creationist”, but then who I am I to judge? I won’t say much here, except that the second Khan’s interpretation of the phenomena of dating among “elite” graduate student bears no resemblance to actual facts on the ground. Which, when it comes to his interpretations of human behavior is par for the course. This is actually one of his better efforts, much worse follows:

Read the rest of this great post here: http://www.ethnography.com/2013/03/gene-promoters-2-the-wrath-of-khan/

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